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2017

Etta 'Sue' Frantz Trimble - Houston Chapter, February 23, 2017

The Ninety-Nines lost one of its most devoted members with the passing of Etta at her home in Horseshoe Bay, Texas, She was born in 1930. Sue, a Ninety-Nine since 1982, was an enthusiastic pilot and member of the Houston Chapter. She and Joe, her first husband of 47 years, were regular attendees at South Central Section meetings and International Conferences. Sue was blessed with the gifts of hospitality and grace, qualities which she generously shared with The Ninety-Nines. - Cathy Prudomme

Mary Alice Tidwell - Purple Sage Chapter, February 4, 2017

Mary Alice Tidwell passed away at the age of 92 in Midland, Texas. She had been a member of The 99s for many years, and she was a charter member of the Purple Sage Chapter. She had held every office in our chapter at one time or another, but her most recent was Chairman had Treasurer. We thought this suited her to a T since she was a CPA! She had a great sense of humor and was always telling us clean, funny jokes, making us laugh, and she was a mentor to many of us. Mary Alice didn't start learning to fly until she was 50 years old, and she never looked back. She loved flying her white and yellow Cessna Skyhawk 172, and every birthday, she gave herself a gift for her airplane. That was the best equipped 172 around, and she flew it for at least 25 years until she decided to give it up due to age and health. She sold her beautiful airplane and cried for a week. She hoped the person who bought it would enjoy it as much as she had. Mary Alice was a member not only of The 99s and the Purple Sage Chapter, but also The Confederate Air Force and The Civil Air Patrol. She was always volunteering for wherever she was needed and for whatever she could do. She is sorely missed, but we know that she has her own wings now and she is flying with joy in her new horizons. - Priscilla Barbee

Ann Luce - Colorado Chapter, January 11, 2017

Ann died peacefully in her sleep on January 11, at her home in Cold Creek Canyon. She was 91. A painter, pilot, art educator and publisher, Ann was active in the Boulder area for over 45 years after spending the first part of her life in the mid-Atlantic states and New York City. She was an accomplished painter and a graduate of St. Timothy's and Vassar College, and also attended the Maryland Institute in Baltimore and the Art Students League in New York City. She married childhood summer neighbor, Gordon Baird, in 1946. After 10 years, the marriage ended and Ann moved to Manhattan, where she taught art and later worked at McCall's magazine and several book publishers, where she later wrote and illustrated dozens of young adult and educational books. Ann also kept a 36-foot sailboat and cruised the New York/New England coast with her sons. Ann was at times fearless, in 1967 sailing her disabled boat into Menemsha, Mass., harbor during a gale, to the astonishment of the local fishermen. Marrying Peter Paul Luce in 1967, she soon moved to Boulder and the couple became one of first residents to build a home at the top of the "hogback" ridge in Coal Creek Canyon, defying high winter winds and trucking in their water. She also took a prominent leadership role in halting a mining operation in the canyon, at one point confronting bulldozers on her horse. Ann took up flying at that time, and obtained a full instrument license that she maintained for 40 years, sometimes facing harrowing experiences similar to what she'd seen on the water, including two forced landings in the U.S. and further adventures in South America. She also became a fine skier, ran marathons in Boulder, and restarted her formal art education, earning her Masters in Art History from Colorado.University at age 50 and specializing in Columbian art. Ann turned this interest into a new educational publishing entity, Alarion Press, that put out film strips, videos and multimedia products. Leveraging her flying skills, Ann regularly hawked her products at national trade shows. She also joined her son, Gordon, to became a cofounder of Musician, a national magazine later purchased by Billboard.
She remained a prolific artist, and became the matriarch of Boulder's Artwork Space studios, subsidizing dozens of creative artists in an intimate, collegial union. After her marriage to Mr. Luce ended, Ann experienced a long friendship with Bill Guinther, a Korean War F-86 pilot and later a popular disabled ski racer at Winter Park and occasional guest conductor for the Boulder Symphony.

2016

Phyllis J Kramer - High Country Chapter, November 4, 2016

Phyllis was born in 1928 in Windsor, Colorado. She was the founder and a charter member of the High Country Chapter (western Colorado). She had previously been active in the Colorado Chapter. 'PJ' served as our first Chapter Chairman and mentored several High Country members to carry on the business of The 99s. - Judy Allerheiligen

Maybelle Montgomery Fletcher - Houston Chapter, October 18, 2016

The aviation world lost one of its icons when Maybelle Montgomery Fletcher flew to New Horizons on October 18, 2016, in Houston, Texas at age 92. Maybelle began her 70-plus year aviation career when she soloed at 16. She met her co-pilot for life, Larry Fletcher, at the airport in Waco, Texas, in 1945, and was delighted to receive a Piper J-3 Cub instead of a traditional diamond ring! Maybelle joined The Ninety-Nines in 1945, served as an FAA Flight Examiner for over 30 years, and logged more than 30,000 flight hours. She founded the flight school at Fletcher Aviation in 1968, with many of her students going on to become airline pilots, military pilots, and even astronauts. In addition to instructing, Maybelle loved air racing, entering nearly every race she could. Maybelle was a consistent “Top-10” finisher, including winning the ARC in 1982. One of Maybelle’s most significant contributions to aviation was her development of the plan accepted by the FAA for Class B airspace for Houston’s Hobby Airport, a plan still in effect today. In 2001, she was inducted into the Texas Aviation Hall of Fame, and in 2004, she became the first woman honored with The Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award and was also presented the Lloyd P. Nolen Lifetime Achievement in Aviation Award by Wings Over Houston. Sadly, her husband Larry Fletcher passed away on December 2, only 45 days after the death of Maybelle. - Cathy Prudhomme

 

 

 

Mary Sloan L’Herisson - Shreveport Chapter, September 1, 2016

Mary was born in Tennessee in 1925, the youngest of four children. Her father died by accident during early efforts to bring electricity to their rural county, and in recognition of his role the TVA honored 9-year-old Mary by letting her throw the switch that first energized the region. She graduated from Huntsville (AL) High School and the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Soon after arriving in Louisiana for her dietetics internship at New Orleans Charity Hospital, Mary met an LSU Med School resident from Bossier Parish named Lawrence Edward L’Herisson. They married on a snowy St. Patrick’s Day in 1945, in Fayetteville, TN.

Mary and Larry settled in Coushatta, Red River Parish, where they built a 23-bed hospital and clinic, and raised their children, Laura Ann, Lawrence Edward, Jr., and Sandra Sloan. Mary played piano every Sunday for her church, grew beautiful roses, cooked delicious healthful meals, hosted great parties, and was active with her children’s many activities: scouting, rodeo, dance, sports, music, and church. She filled the home with music and taught her children their first piano lessons.

Mary was a private pilot and a lifetime member of The 99s. She made many dear friends with other 99s that endured her whole life. In the late 1960s, Mary and her son were the first mother-son pair to get private pilot licenses at their flight school. Mary was also active in the medical auxiliary, opera guild, DAR, UDC, and bridge clubs. 

2015

Martha Ann Reading - Dallas Chapter, October, 2015

Martha Ann Reading was born in Dallas, Texas on June 7, 1920 and passed peacefully at her ranch near Glen Rose, Texas, surrounded by her family. She learned to fly in 1946 at Mustang Field in Dallas, Texas in a tandem model Aeronca trainer. At the time, she was a Civil Engineering Draftsman for the Texas Highway Department. Over the years, she also flew Cubs and Cessnas. She and husband Bob, her favorite navigator, owned an Ercoupe, which they inscribed with “Martha Ann”. They later purchased a Piper Tri-Pacer.

She had a distinguished record with the Civil Air Patrol, which she joined in 1951. She quickly rose through the ranks, eventually becoming the first woman to achieve the rank of Lt. Colonel. Martha Ann managed communications for the CAP Southwest Region, and designed one of the official women’s uniforms.  

Martha Ann joined the Texas Chapter of The 99s in 1947. This chapter was split into several regional Chapters in 1957, the Dallas Chapter being one of them. Thus, Martha Ann became one of 16 charter members of the Dallas Chapter. Over the years, she held every office at the Chapter and Section levels, including South Central Section Governor 1958-1960. In addition, she served on the International Nominating Committee, Headquarters Committee, and held International positions of Secretary and Airmarking Chairman.  

Martha Ann participated in many flying activities, including three All-Texas Air Tours, eleven derbies including Dallas Doll and Texas Skylady, and one AWTAR (All-Woman Transcontinental Air Race), which later became known as the Powder Puff Derby.  

Martha Ann was an artist, jewelry maker and instructor with an ageless capacity for learning and sharing. She taught jewelry making at Northlake Community College, did course work in Rome, Italy (in her eighties) and was a student at El Centro Community College. She was very proud to be its oldest student, attending until she was 94. She was also a board member and instructor for the Craft Guild of Dallas where she served several terms as President, Secretary, and Treasurer. A member of the American Society of Goldsmiths, she was a certified gemologist, lapidary artist, silversmith, enamelist, certified silver clay instructor, stone setter, engraver, and metal anodizer. 

She was active with the Dallas Chapter until her move to Glen Rose in 2014 for health reasons. She assisted with our Girl Scout seminars and baked airplane cookies for the girls. She made beautiful airplane jewelry for our chapter to sell. Her presence brought joy to our hearts. She was very dear to us, and we miss her very much. The Dallas Chapter honored Martha Ann’s memory with a tile in the compass rose at International Headquarters.

She is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, two grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. - Holly Barr and Lisa Billings, Family Friend

Wadad 'Poochie' Rotzinger - Oklahoma Chapter, August 24, 2015

Wadad ‘Poochie’ Rotzinger Oklahoma Chapter Our Grandma, Wadad ‘Poochie’ Rotzinger, passed away on August 24, 2015. She was born to John and Shala Hassen on March 19, 1929 in Ranger, Texas. Grandma and her three siblings grew up in Sulphur, Oklahoma. She graduated from Sulphur High School and Oklahoma City University. She married the love of her life, the late Edmund Rotzinger, on August 24, 1950. In 1951, they welcomed a beloved daughter, Carol Louise. Grandma taught high school biology and physical education for several years and then taught driver’s education to the instructors at Central State University. Never one to slow down, Grandma decided to become a pilot later in life. It was through this hobby that she developed a passion for The Ninety-Nines. We will joyfully remember her decked out in airplane jewelry and airplane sweaters. Flying, family and friends were her three greatest passions. In addition to flying, Grandma was an avid motorcyclist who also taught motorcycle safety courses. We always loved bragging that our Grandma was a pilot who rode motorcycles. She redefined what a ‘cool Grandma’ should be. Our Grandma and Grandpa were truly a team who dedicated their lives to one another. After almost 65 blissful years of marriage, Grandma has now followed Grandpa to heaven just three months after he passed away after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s. We love you, Grandma. Now you can truly fly among the heavens. - Regan Leigh Morgan and Cara Weiblinger, granddaughters

Janet Yoder - Kansas Chapter, May 24, 2015


Janet S. Yoder Kansas City Chapter Janet S. Yoder passed away Sunday, May 24, 2015. Janet was born November 23, 1941, and enjoyed an adventurous life. She was a retired ACS nurse anesthetist with a commercial pilot certificate. She also held multi-engine, instrument and seaplane ratings. She participated in 27 Air Race Classics. Those who knew her remember her big smile, the twinkle in her eye and her excellent piloting skills. Janet went out of her way to be friendly and inclusive, and was a “go-getter” who enthusiastically tackled projects big and small. She will be a big loss to our Chapter, and we will miss her dearly. - Dawn Wavle

 

 

Peggy Long - Colorado Chapter, April 15, 2015

Gladys Ilene (Barton) McCaslin - Oklahoma Chapter, February 3, 2015

. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

ueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Gladys was an active member of the Oklahoma Chapter for many years and was famed for the food she prepared for our Okie Derby and other events. Gladys and her husband Ben owned their own grass airstrip in Lexington, Oklahoma. Often Gladys and the other pilots who hangared there sponsored popular fly-ns. Out Chapter enjoyed many parties in her semi-underground home on the airport. She also delighted in hosting sleepovers in her hanger for CAP cadets.  -- Carol Sokatch

 

2014

Deborah Kwaitkowski Price - Colorado Chapter, November 22, 2014

. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

ueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Colorado Chapter Chairman Deb Price, 56, passed away unexpectedly on November 22, 2014. Deb loved aviation and flight instruction. She graduated from the University of Florida and worked for Bell Labs, now Avaya. She was a computer science major and, as she enjoyed telling people, "a recovering engineer," having in recent years made the career shift to being a certified dog trainer. Deb had worked for several flight schools and Alpha Flying, Inc., now known as PlaneSense, flying the Pilatus PC-12. She was an active participant in the Flight Without Fear program sponsored by the Colorado Chapter. The Colorado Ninety-Nines had been one of her greatest loves. Deb will always be remembered as sweet, king and giving. She will be missed.  -- Margot Plummer

 

Wayna Lea Lee - Oklahoma Chapter, October 14, 2014

. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

ueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Wayna Lea Lee was retired military civil service with Altus Air Force Base in Altus, Oklahoma and Vance Air Force Base in Enid, Oklahoma. She loved flying, riding horses and traveling with her husband Porter in their RV. She was an active member of the Oklahoma Chapter 99s and Oklahoma Pilots Association for many years. -- by Carol Sokatch

 

Betty Era Jones - Purple Sage Chapter, July 6, 2014

. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

ueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Betty Era Jones, 68, was our Purple Sage Chapter Vice- Chairman when she passed away on July 6, 2014, at her home in Odessa, TX after a two-year battle with cancer. Betty was a 99 when she became a charter member of the Purple Sage Chapter in 1984. She flew a yellow and white Cessna 172 and a red Pitts. She took lessons in a two-seat Pitts so she could fly and do aerobatics in her husband’s one-seat red Pitts he had built himself. In addition to being a 99, Betty was also a member of EAA and the West Texas Flyers. When she wasn’t flying, she was a wife, mother, grandmother, seamstress, embroiderer, tax preparer, and a good friend to all who knew her well. We miss Betty very much. Keep flying, Betty!

Janet Koonce - Purple Sage Chapter, June 13, 2014

Janet Williams Koonce, 74, was the Purple Sage Chapter Chairman when she passed away on June 13, 2014, at her home in Midland, Texas after a short battle with cancer. Janet started coming to our chapter meetings in the early 1980’s as a “66” (student pilot), but it wasn’t long before she earned her single-engine plane pilot license and joined The 99s, Inc. and our Purple Sage Chapter. She held every office in our Chapter at least once, and usually multiple times, and she always hosted our Chapter Christmas Party in her home for us every year. Janet was a fun and sweet person, and she was our friend. We miss her very much.

Margaret Marie Cosby - San Antonio Chapter, January 27, 2014

. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

ueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Saying goodbye to our good friends is never easy. Our sister San Antonio 99, Margaret Marie Cosby, flew on angel's wings January 27, 2014. She was a wonderful friend to so many. If not for Margaret, I might have never known about The 99s! I met her at a General Aviation pilot safety meeting, and she asked me if I was a 99. I asker what a 99 was. Of course I jointed soon after. I flew with Margaret many times, not only as her instructor but as a friend. Her most eloquent obituary was written by her son Michael, an F-16 pilot who was also her initial flight instructor. They shared many worldly adventures. Margaret always bragged about him, deservedly so!  - by Cheryl Mota


Jane Nettleblad - Colorado Chapter, September 22, 1919 - January 16, 2014

elen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

ueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. From grade six, Helen attended the Pasadena schools, then attended junior college and UCLA, where she pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley and worked in the Pasadena Health Department, St. Joseph's Hospital in Orange County, St. Lukes Hospital in Pasadena and the Los Angeles Health Department. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947, where John was self-employed as a petroleum geologist. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller, a consulting geologist. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Helen had an avid interest in other cultures, people and objects, which led her to collect many masks, ceramics, and carvings from throughout the world during their many travels. In additon to objects, Helen loved "collecting people," and doing mini-ethnographies as part of her travels. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. Firm believers in the importance of education, Helen and Paul Pustmueller established endowments for scholarships at the University of Denver and Colorado School of Mines. Together, Helen and Paul had 8 daughters, 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at the Bullock Colonial Chapel, 1375 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, on Monday, August 12th at 12 Noon. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/denverpost/obituary.aspx?pid=166348053#fbLoggedOut

Dorothy Jane (Hazard) Nettleblad, 94, a long-time resident of Arvada, passed away January 16, 2014 at Westminster, Colorado. She was born at Saguache,  Colorado September 22, 1919 to George Herbert and Cora Zoe (Stewart) Hazard. She attended the Saguache public schools and graduated from Saguache County High School in 1937. Janes mother Zoe introduced her and her brother George to airplanes and flying at early ages when she took them to a county fair at Saguache. Probably, due at least in part to this early exposure, they both learned to fly as adults. Jane became one of the first licensed women pilots in the Rocky Mountain region, and she co-founded the Colorado Chapter of The Ninety-Nines.

Jane pursued her lifelong interest in education, first obtaining a B.A. degree in music education from Denver University, then receiving her M.A. degree from Colorado University, and later completing additional coursework in Spanish. She taught for many years in the Denver Public Schools as a classroom and music teacher. She accomplished all of these things while living through the austere years of World War II and while bearing and raising a family. Enjoying and participating in many sports, Jane remained physically active throughout most of her life. She loved hiking, water skiing and snow skiing, and she competed in tennis, bicycling, and swimming. As a senior tri-athlete, she remained competitive until the age of 77. She enjoyed traveling as well and visited many places around the world. To those people who knew her, Jane was a wonderful example for pursuing lifelong learning, being healthy and fit, and living life to its fullest. She was one of the few blessed people who could say she did everything she had wanted to do.

2013

Dora Dougherty Strother McKeown - Fort Worth Chapter, November 19, 2013 -- WASP

Dora flew to new horizons on November 19. She was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. Dora became a pilot in 1940 in the Civilian Pilot Training program and joined Jacqueline Cochran's WASP, becoming a member of the Ferry Command. Dora was one of only two WASP who were checked out in the B-29 by Paul Tibbetts. Dora flew 23 different aircraft during the war. Later she joined the University of Illinois to become their Chief Research Pilot. In 1958, Dora moved on to Bell Helicopter and became Chief of the Human Factors and Cockpit Arrangement Group. She was a prolific writer and researcher. Dora had been a Trustee for the Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarship Fund. Her family has made the request that any donations in her memory be made to the AEMSF. Dora was an absolutely phenomenal woman. Her passing will leave a tremendous void in the aviation community. - Jacque Boyd

Elizabeth (Susie) Sewell - Oklahoma Chapter, November 8, 2013 -- President of The Ninety-Nines, 1972-74

Elizabeth (Susie) Sewell passed away Friday, November 8, 2013 in Oklahoma City. Susie's interest in aviation was sparked when her father was an employee of Skelly Oil Company, which also owned Spartan Aviation. She started flying lessons in 1944 and in 1947 received an Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarship to obtain her commercial certificate and CFI rating. After studying business law, corporate finance and business management at the University of Oklahoma, she joined Catlin Aviation as secretary/treasurer and moved up in its corporate structure to become operations manager and then acting general manager. When Catlin expanded to become a Piper distributor, Susie became one of the first women to be on the Distributors Advisory Council, helping Piper make decisions for aircraft improvements. During her term as international president of The Ninety-Nines, she was instrumental in establishing the headquarters building at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Susie became the first female agent in Oklahoma for aviation insurance, and starting in 1969 served as Chairman of the Aviation Insurance Committee for The Ninety-Nines's sponsored flying events. She also served as a member and ex officio member of the Board of Directors, as Treasurer and as Trustee of the AEMS fund. She was a member of the Oklahoma Chapter of The Ninety- Nines. Susie once said,"If I helped to open some doors in aviation for others to follow, I will be pleased to cheer them on." She truly succeeded in that goal and will continue to inspire us. - Donna Jackson

Iona May Inmon Gamertsfelder - Rio Grande Norte Chapter, September 18, 2013

Iona Gamertsfelder of Las Vegas, New Mexico, died of cancer on September 18, 2013, at the age of 84. She was born April 29, 1929, on the Inmon Ranch in the far southwestern boot heel of New Mexico. She was a golfer, pilot, teacher and homemaker with four children, eleven grandkids and five great-grandkids. A member of The 99s since 1990, Iona learned to fly as a teenager. She and her brother flew their J-3 Cub from the ranch to school every day, but it wasn't until nearly 50 years later that she received her private pilot certificate. Delightfully spunky, Iona will be missed by all of her Rio Grande Norte Chapter sisters. - Elizabeth Hunke

Lucille Watkins - Oklahoma Chapter, August 20, 2013

Lucille Watkins departed this earth on August 20, 2013, after a life devoted to her six musical sons and her career in music. She played the organ at churches and the piano at nightclubs and parties. Lucille earned her private certificate in 1965 and was sponsored into the Ohio Chapter. After moving to Oklahoma City, she was active with the Oklahoma Chapter and was organist at St. Joseph Cathedral. On the day of the Murrah Building bombing in 1999, she had intended to practice on the organ at St. Joseph's but instead opted to visit a friend in the hospital. She escaped injury since the cathedral is just across the street from the bomb site and suffered severe damage. We will miss Lucille's unique talents and love of The Ninety- Nines.

Helen Pustmueller - Colorado Chapter, August 9, 2013

HelenPustmueller.jpg (1212553 bytes)Helen Pustmueller was born Helen Ruth Ward in Gilman, Iowa on April 26, 1913. She passed peacefully on August 9, 2013 in Englewood, Colorado, having recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Helen's father moved the family to California where he practiced medicine. Her father was fascinated by flight, and often took young Helen to air meets. They made a special trip to see the Graf Zeppelin when it came to Los Angeles. However, he would never go up in a small plane. She earned a degree in Bacteriology from the University of California at Berkley. Helen married John Maxson in 1939, a Cal Tech geology professor and reserve officer in the Air Corps. John was called to active duty, so he and Helen moved to Washington D.C. John then went to Turkey with Office of Strategic Services (OSS). John was also implemental in mapping the Grand Canyon. Helen returned to Pasadena during the war with two daughters. After the war, a third daughter was born and the family moved to Denver in 1947. They both learned to fly during their early years in Denver and had their own airplane. After John's death in 1966 Helen renewed her interest in flying and got her commercial certificate and instrument rating. She flew in two Powder Puff Derbies and three Angel Derbies with her friend Jan Gammel in a Comanche 250 and 260. In 1971, Helen married Paul Pustmueller. In 1977 she earned her Master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Denver. She became Curator of Collections of the DU Museum of Anthropology in 1980 and held that position until 1996. Together Helen and Paul bought an airplane, and Paul learned to fly. Helen and Paul participated in fly-yourself safaris in South Africa, Botswana, Rhodesia, Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii, and owned a Cessna 170, 180, Turbo 206 and a Turbo Centurion. Helen was a member of the Ninety Nines, the Silver Wings Fraternity and the Colorado Pilots Association. 

Nancy Waylett Berra - Ambassador Chapter, June 29, 2013

Nancy Waylett Berra passed away on June 29, 2013, following a 12-year battle with a brain tumor. She was a champion in the fight but, nearing the end, traveled home by transport ambulance and was made comfortable in hospice at her Burtonsville, Maryland home. Her husband Bob Berra, two sons, a daughter, and Nancy's mother Agnes Waylett were close by. Nancy was a true trailblazer  and had a celebrated career as one of the first female commercial airline pilots. She was hired by US Air in 1985 and always based at DCA/BWI. Nancy was a member of The 99s for over 20 years, including the Ambassador, Potomac and Colorado Chapters, along with  being a supporter of the Washington DC 99s. Nancy was born on November 25, 1950 and graduated from Gettysburg College in 1973. College friends described her independence, determination and philosophical bent. Fellow pilots recall her as "always a joy to fly with, and her smile and easy-going nature made the trip go by way too fast." Another coworker states, "I enjoyed her company at several women airline pilot conventions. She was kind and caring, witty and charming. We've lost a treasure." - Pat Schroeder 

Betty Jo Reed - Colorado Chapter, June 22, 2013

BettyJoStreffReed.jpg (1152827 bytes)Betty Jo peacefully passed away Saturday, June 22, 2013 at the Denver VA Community Living Center. She was a brave and beautiful 90 years old. Betty Jo was a WASP (Women Air Force Service Pilots) in WWII and is in the Aviation Hall of Fame in both Colorado and Texas. She was very proud to be a recipient of a Congressional Gold Medal in 2010. In 1956, Betty Jo and her husband Carl W. Reed opened the third McDonald's Restaurant in the country in Denver and went on to open ten McDonald's Restaurants total, all in Denver.

 

Zada Arentz - Colorado Chapter, April 20, 2013

Zada Fillmore Arentz, 94, formerly of Rigby, passed away Saturday, April 20, 2013.

2012

Patricia Chester - Golden Triangle Chapter, October 17, 2012

Pat was born June 18, 1932 in Memphis, Tennessee, and married Robert Chester in Fort Worth, Texas, on July 21, 1951. She had a doctorate in metaphysics. After retiring from the University of Texas-Arlington as department administrator in the Foreign Language and Linguistics Department, she became a psychotherapist.

She loved flying their Cessna Cardinal and relished recalling early adventures into Mexico when customs officials were reluctant to recognize her as pilot-in-command. She joined Golden Triangle Chapter in 1972 and showed her enthusiasm immediately by chairing the old 'APT' committee. She went on to serve in all Chapter officer positions and chaired other committees. She was a life member.

'Von' Alter - Pikes Peak Chapter, October 10  2012

LaVonna Alter was born August 6, 1928 in Denver Colorado. Von grew up in Colorado Springs, but lived in many places in the U.S. and around the world. She was interest in many things, including visual art, flying, jazz and travel. Her ratings included commercial, instrument and multi engine and participated in the final 'Powerder Puff Derby' in 1976. She competed in many air races throughout the country.

Gwen Crawford - Oklahoma Chapter, July 2012

The 99s lost a cherished friend and steadfast supporter in Gwen LCrawford. From her first Powder Puff Derby in 1972 to the airplane earrings she wore every day in later years at St. Anne's Retirement Center, it was clear that her associations with aviation, The Ninety-Nines and the Flying Farmers, were highlights in her life.

Helen Holbird - Oklahoma Chapter, June 14  2012

 Helen Holbird earned her private pilot certificate at age 52 and becarme very active with The 99s. She loved flying her Cessna 172 and was the first to donate her plane to establish an endowment fund for the Museum of Women Pilots. Helen was also a valued member of CAP and the Oklahoma Pilots Association. She was always generous of her time, energy and resources. We will miss our fried, this warm, caring lady.

Charlotte Klyn - Colorado Chapter, March 30, 2012

Charlotte KlynCharlotte Piffer Schrier was born on June 14, 1916, in Indianola, Iowa. She married Andrew Klyn in 1941.

In the late 1960s, Charlotte followed Andy�s interest in flying and began taking flying lessons. After obtaining her private pilot�s license, she subsequently achieved the Pilot Ratings of Commercial, Multi-Engine, Instrument, and Airline Transport, the Flight Instructor Ratings of Airplane, Instrument, and Gold Seal, and the Ground Instructor Ratings of Advanced and Instrument. She also became a Federal Aviation Administration Flight Examiner for Private, Commercial, Multi-Engine, and Instrument Ratings.

In 1973 Charlotte became a professor in the Aerospace Science Department of Metropolitan State College in Denver, Colorado. Upon her retirement from Metro in 1982, she was awarded the status of Professor Emerita and returned to Pella, Iowa.

Charlotte and Andy used their airplane for relaxation and to travel the entirety of the United States and Mexico. She and Andy loved the people and culture of Mexico, considered Mazatlan, Mexico, to be their second home.

She was a member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority, PEO Chapter BU, the Pella Garden Club, the Pella Historical Society, and The Ninety-Nines International Organization of Women Pilots.

Pauline Glasson - Tip of Texas Chapter, March 30, 2012

Pauline Glasson, 101, of Corpus Christi, Texas, passed away Friday, March 30, 2012 at her home. She was born May 6, 1910 in Boyd, Kentucky to Joseph Early and Frances Butcher Cummins.
She soloed in 1934 at the age of 22 in a Aronica Sea Plane. She was a life member of the Ninety-Nines, flew all but two of the Powder Puff Derbys and was one of the founders of the Air Race Classic where she was an active and then honorary member of the Board of Directors. She had over 60,000 hours of flying experience and operated a local flight school.

2011

Betty Haas Pfister - South Central Section, November 17, 2011

wpe1.gif (20999 bytes)Elizabeth Haas Pfister, a two-time winner of the All Women's International Aire Race, died November 17 at her home in Aspen, Colorado. She was 90. She was born on July 23, 1921 in Great Neck, New York.  

Betty began flying when she was 19, sneaking her first flight after a local air show in Vermont. When World War II erupted, she was qualified to join the Air Force�s female branch, Women Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPs. In 1994 she was named an Elder Statesman of Aviation by the National Aeronautical Association, and in 2010 she and other surviving WASPs were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal.

At one point she took up gliding, receiving her license in 1966. She flew both lighter than air and helium balloons, and participated in hydrogen balloon races in the Swiss Alps. She founded the Snowmass Balloon Races in 1976 and organized and chaired that competition until 1981.

She was one of the original members of the Aspen Chapter, which was active for several years in the 1990s.

Laura Richter - San Antonio Chapter, March 18, 2011

A very sad time for our chapter and the entire 99s organization. Laura Richter took her last flight on March 18, after enduring treatments of chemo and radiation for cancer. She was brave until the end and left peacefully. Her wonderful family remembered her life during the viewing and church services with powerpoint presentations. It was very moving. It was no complete surprise that Laura�s headstone at the cemetery has a Piper aircraft engraved on it. She loved to fly and would fly with anyone at any time. Of course, we all knew about her emergency landing. It was revealed at the reception that her husband found out she had earned her pilot wings when the media got wind of her cornfield emergency landing. What a surprise that must have been. She certainly is to be commended. As a single parent, she taught school, raised six children and went back to school to earn her Master�s Degree. She missed less than a handful of 99s International Conferences during her 41 years as a 99, and fewer Section meetings. We never knew her to decline whenever asked to participate or chair as was needed in The 99s. There is a huge hole where Laura�s sweet spirit lived on earth, but heaven is much for the better. We miss you, Laura.

2010

Velda King Mapelli (previously with the Colorado Chapter), April 19, 2010

Aviation and business entrepreneur Velda King Mapelli, 83 was killed by a cyclist while walking on a trail near her home in Renton, Washington. Both the cyclist and Mapelli were knocked unconscious. Mapelli succumbed to her catastrophic injuries on Monday, April 19. 2010.

Mapellie was best known for her record setting 7-year Presidency of The Air Race Classic.

With respect to her flying accomplishments, Velda became the corporate pilot to facilitate the family meat-packing business. With only six percent of the pilots being women, she soon joined The Ninety-Nines, the women�s pilot organization and discovered pilot-skilled cross country speed air racing. Racing brought her a lifelong friendship with Marion Jayne, ATP, Hall of Fame enshrinee and 100 Aviation Hero for the First Century of Flight.

Mapelli, together with Jayne and five other pilots, founded the Air Race Classic, the all-women cross country speed race which replaced the 1929-1976 All Women Transcontinental Air Race a.k.a. the Powder Puff Derby - although, anyone who has competed in a transcontinental race of any variety would call powder-puff a misnomer.

Her elegant, polished style was complimented by her athletic grace and consummate organizational skills. Her business talent brought the women�s race its first and still the most lucrative corporate sponsor with the years the event was known as the Hughes Airwest Air Race Classic.

Mapelliï's personal plane started out as a 260 Comanche N9071P that echoed her owner's stellar style with meticulous maintenance. Sadly, the 260 was lost when the shop it was in while it waited for the overhauled engine burned. A classy Cessna 414 replaced the vibrant Comanche until Velda hung up her headset for the last time.

2009

Onita Winfrey - Pikes Peak Chapter, September 13, 2009

Onita Winfrey was an adventuresome person, which explains her motivation to learn to fly during the early barnstorming days. She  obtained her private pilot certificate flying in J3 Cubs, Champs and similar aircraft. She was very disappointed when she wasn't chosen to join the WASP during WWII.

From that point, her life took a different direction, and she focused on earning a living doing secretarial work. A government job brought her to Colorado Springs where she lived until her death. As a senior citizen, she became a model and was in demand for television, newspaper and magazine ads. It was during this time that she discovered the Pikes Peak Chapter and made inquiries about joining. She was 82 years old. From that moment, Onita found a place where she could be among other women pilots.

As long as she was able, she flew with us, attended meetings and helped in any way she could. One of her favorite contributions was a freshly baked batch of brownies. In her home she had a wall decorated with photos of her aviation experiences and of members of the Pikes Peak Chapter. Several 99s worked together to finish a quilt that had been started by her mother in the 1930s. That quilt was always on Onitaï's bed.

Onita was a respected member of our Chapter. At 97, she was our oldest member. - Phyllis Wells

Joye Baker - Colorado Chapter, May 29, 2009

Joye (Smith) Baker passed away suddenly while at home in Northglenn, Colorado on Friday May 29, 2009.  She was born in Springfield, Ohio on March 7, 1940. She spent most of her life enjoying adventures in Colorado . She graduated from Canon City High School in Colorado 1958 and was involved in ROTC and band.  She married Dr. John C. Baker on Oct. 14, 1960 and they had two children, Jill (Baker) Lafferty and John A. Baker.  She was the business manager for her husband's family practice for many years.  

In the 70's she earned her private pilots license and quickly received her instrument and commercial licenses as well.  She joined the 99s in 1972 and was very active for many years and was the Colorado Chapter Chairman in the 70's. She flew several air races and learned to fly aerobatics. Throughout her flying history she flew more than 30 different types of aircraft from a tiny Mooney Mite to a large DeHavilland Beaver and everything in between.  

 In 1980 they moved to Ouray, Colorado and she received her real estate license and sold property in the area for several years.  Later they returned to Denver and bought a 27½' Norsea sailboat and sailed it down the inland waterway and across to the Bahamas, quite a feat for her as she was really afraid of water. She overcame that fear and took her night watches on the pitch black ocean. She also enjoyed driving their 1915 Model T Ford. She was an avid skier and loved to ski with her grandchildren. She was always curious, adventurous and kind, she will leave a huge void in our lives. As per her wishes, there was no funeral or services. A celebration will be held to celebrate her life.

2008

Sondra Joan Ridgeway - Northeast Kansas Chapter, October 20, 2008

Sondra was the immediate past chairman of the Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum Trust. She also served as the Vice-Chairman for the Northeast Kansas Chapter. She passed away on October from complications of cancer.

Jessica McMillan - High Country Chapter, May 10, 2008

High Country Co-Chair Jessica McMillan passed on to new horizons on May 10, 2008, at peace and surrounded by her loving family, after waging a courageous battle against an aggressive cancer.

Jessica joined the Colorado Chapter of The Ninety-Nines in 1984 and was an active participant in chapter activities and served as secretary, vice-chair and chapter chair. In 1997, she transferred to the High Country Chapter and was most recently membership chair and chapter co-chair. Jessica had amassed over 4,000 hours of flight time, most of it doing what she loved most - teaching others to fly. She had won two Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarships, one for her CFI and the other for her MEI. A woman of many interests and talents, she was an accomplished artist and graphic designer, an EMT; on the National Ski Patrol, taught skiing and toboggoing; enjoyed river rafting, boating and travel; managed a FBO and ran two flight schools. Jessica is survived by her husband Bruce, two sisters and five nieces. We will miss her radiant ever-present smile and constant encouragement.

Margie Richison - Oklahoma Chapter, April 6, 2008

Margie Richison, Chair of the Board of Trustees for the 99s Museum of Women Pilots developed serious complications following surgery on February 29, 2008. She never recovered and passed away quietly at 12:27 pm on Sunday, April 6, 2008. Her family was at her side.

Marjorie Jane (Wilson) Richison, was born September 1, 1941, in Little Rock, Arkansas, to Robert and Emily Wilson. She graduated from Nebraska City High School in 1959 and the University of Nebraska College of Nursing in Omaha in 1963. She learned to fly at the University of Oklahoma Department of Aviation and became a Ground School and Flight Instructor for Oklahoma University. She joined The 99s, an International Organization of Women Pilots and was very active in the Oklahoma Chapter. She loved to race and won first place in two Okie Derby Air Races, and flew in the last two Air Race Classic races. She has been Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the 99s Museum of Women Pilots in Oklahoma City for the past four years. She has taught many people to fly and encouraged many more to learn to fly.

Elinor Reay Johnson - Dallas Chapter, February 11, 2008

Elinor Reay Johnson was a Life member of the Dallas chapter who passed away on February 11, 2008 in Emory, Texas. She joined The 99s on September 11, 1961.

Born in Bisbee, Arizona on March 9, 1924, Elinor graduated from the University of California with a B.S. in Public Health in 1945. Elinor relocated to Dallas in 1957 with her husband and four children. She learned to fly in 1960 and achieved private pilot, commercial, instrument and instructor certifications, and was a flight instructor at Highland Park and Addison airports for many years. She was an active member of the Dallas and Redbird Chapters of The Ninety-Nines, a women's flying club. Elinor flew in the All-Women's cross-country air races, the Powder Puff Derby and the Air Race Classic, placing in the top 10 four times and taking first place in 1980 as co-pilot of a two-woman racing team. In addition to her love of flying, Elinor enjoyed quilting and gardening. She worked as a mechanical draftsman and a laboratory technician, and volunteered as a docent at the Frontiers of Flight Museum.


2006

Katherine M. Long - Section Member, June 6, 2006
 
A Life member who belonged to the now-defunct Dallas-Redbird Chapter, and a South Central Section member at the time of her death, Kathy was born December 28, 1921and passed away June 6, 2006.  She learned to fly in 1959, along with husband, L. K. Long, beginning a lifelong love and passion for flying.  She traveled the world in her Bellanca aircraft, participating and racing in many Powder Puff Derbies and International Angel Derbies, along with other races.  She was a judge for many flying competitions, including college competitions. She was the Dallas area dealer for Bellanca aircraft for many years.

Ruth Deerman - El Paso Chapter, May 6, 2006 - International 99s President 1963-1965

Ruth Deerman was born June 17, 1905. A pioneer aviatrix, Ruth Deerman got her pilot�s license in 1944 in El Paso, Texas. That fulfilled her early childhood aim to fly, but that was only the beginning of encouraging women to fly and for all people to appreciate aviation. Musing about jumping off the barn roof with an umbrella at age seven, she often told people that she nearly broke her neck but was determined to someday fly. She was a charter member of the El Paso Ninety-Nines and also helped found the El Paso Aviation Association.Spot landing champ, navagation czar, you-name-it, she liked being first and filled her house with trophies. She, along with co-pilot Ruby Hays, won the 1954 All-Women Transcontinental Air Race (Powder Puff Derby) flying from Long Beach CA to Knoxville TN. As International President she introduced the term for the �significant others� of Ninety-Nines as 49&1/2s. She also coined the term for pilots in training as 66s but is now termed FWPs. The song that captured her spirit goes �Oh, give me land, lots of land under starry skies above, don�t fence me in.  Let me ride through the wide open country that I love, don�t fence me in��

REMEMBERING RUTH

There's a memory
There's a memory
A vision in the sky---
There's a twinkle
A twinkle from her eye.
There's a smile,
invincible----
just like her style.
There's a tenderness, a caring
A presence of honor-bearing.

In the memory, light clouds roll away
revealing Ruth's face: radiant as day!
With propellers awhirling---
She could be flying or even whirlybirding.
We know it is she---
why, she's as shoeless as can be!
With Cotton Clipper Cutie
she climbs majestically---
away from earth and on to victory.
An aviator of extraordinary degree,
Our Ruth has departed for a destination heavenly.
So open up those pearly gates---
Ruth's arrival all heaven awaits!
    By Trish Shaw, El Paso 99s

Hazel Marcella Corry - Dallas Chapter, April 10, 2006

A Dallas Chapter member, Hazel was born on May 17, 1916 and passed away April 10, 2006.  She joined The 99s July 27, 1959 and was a life member.  She and her husband operated a flight school and general operation at Highland Park Airport before it was replaced by a " high-rise".  She also ran a flight school on Addison Airport in a building now located behind the Addison Police Department.  She was always ready to help with any projects in which the chapter was involved.  She did not do much race flying or set any records but was a genuine friend to everyone she knew.

2005

Dorothy A. Martin - Northeast Kansas Chapter - December 30, 2005

Dorothy Martin died Friday, Dec. 30, 2005, at her home. She was born July 1, 1936, in Evanston, Ill. Mrs. Martin worked as a certified operating room nurse at Lawrence Memorial Hospital for 25 years. She was a member of the church, the Association of Operating Nurses, the Northeast Kansas Chapter of The 99s, Kansas Pilots Assn., Aircraft Owners and Pilots Assn., American Yankee Assn. and Bosom Buddies, a breast cancer support group.

Vivian "Penny" White - Golden Triangle Chapter - October 23, 2005
Penny learned to fly a Cessna 172 in Manhattan, KS, at age 40 while teaching kindergarten and writing and composing songs and stories for a children's  program called "Pennys' Pardners." Her first passenger was 99 Helen Simmons, who upon landing on a ranch and being greeted by Marilyn Copeland, Gene Nora Jenson and Pat McEwen asked her to join the Kansas Chapter of the 99s. The highlights of her career were: chartering then Golden Triangle Chapter with Brenda Strickler in  1969; teaching first grade for 25 years with an abundant dose of aviation as well as basics; receiving "Outstanding Senior Citizen" of Arlington, TX in 1990. Penny was born July 11, 1921.

Mary Doris Weller - Dallas Chapter - February 14, 2005
Doris was born December 26, 1915.  She joined The 99s in October 1950 and was a life member. She was one of the founding members of the Dallas chapter. Mary worked for the FAA for many years as an Air Traffic Controller and was active in the Ninety-Nines and the Civil Air Patrol.She had approximately 1,500 hours of flight time.  At the time of her death, Doris was living in Lincoln, NE.  


2004

Mary Ann Rhine Hennessey - Dallas Chapter - August 25, 2004
Mary Ann was a 40+ year member of the 99s and an active member of the Dallas chapter. Although no longer actively flying, Mary Ann loved flying and being involved with the 99s. She could always be counted on to be present at every chapter activity - be it airmarkings, pancake breakfasts, Poker Runs or chapter meetings. She was 72.


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